NonCompressibleFiles

Submit portable freeware that you find here. It helps if you include information like description, extraction instruction, Unicode support, whether it writes to the registry, and so on.
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Checker
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NonCompressibleFiles

#1 Post by Checker » Fri Mar 30, 2012 12:24 pm

NonCompressibleFiles is a small portable program that allows you to create on the fly one or more non-compressible files, or maximum compressible files.

The purpose of the program is that you can do various tests with these files, such as to test compression programs on their performance, or other programs, such as FTP programs to determine when the transmission of the data is compressed or not, or test the behavior of several files. Similarly, solid state drives, where data is compressed to increase performance.

With this program you can create thousands of files to test the behavior of programs or hardware (eg pci-e ssd) in multiple files test.

# Features:
- Very small program
- User-definable number of files
- Adjustable size of files
- Creation of non-compressible files
- Creation of maximum compressible files (zero files)
- Portable

Download: http://www.softwareok.com/?Download=Non ... sibleFiles

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Re: NonCompressibleFiles

#2 Post by Checker » Fri Mar 30, 2012 12:48 pm


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guinness
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Re: NonCompressibleFiles

#3 Post by guinness » Fri Mar 30, 2012 1:29 pm

Tested: Portable

Creates a hidden file called NonCompressibleFiles.ini in the application's folder. To overcome this just create a file called NonCompressibleFiles.ini before you run the application. I don't really understand why developers set the ini file as hidden, I don't purely on the basis that if someone is going to play around with the ini they will have a basic understand of computers, as most don't touch them due to fear of breaking something.
Added 179 Applications: Portable

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webfork
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Re: NonCompressibleFiles

#4 Post by webfork » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:19 pm

This program remains in active development, but I wanted to point to a post in an earlier thread about a similar program: dummy file creator. I always assumed that NonCompressibleFiles was just a testing tool, but in fact there are a variety of possible uses (some more viable than others):
  • Dummy File Creator website wrote:* Prevent easy spread of illegal copies of your software - Imagine you just publish a new software with a size of 56MB onto a CD. You can fill the the remaining 644MB free CD space with fake files. If you cannot stop the crackers, you can still slow them down. People who try to transfer your software over the internet will have to spend longer time, while the authentic users who purchased your CD will not be affected.

    * Fool people on peer-to-peer file sharing networks - Although most peer to peer network programs have built-in CRC/Hashing check to prevent malicious fake files, a person can still share fake files with the same file name or catching program/media title to confuse P-to-P users.

    * Enhance protection of exsiting encryption - put a few fake files with randomly generated content along with your encrypted files. Investigators will have tough time finding/decrpyting your files, since they won't even know which one to start with!

    * Test drive fitness - simply fill up the drive with a large dummy file. Any bad sector will result an write error.

    * Wipe data to prevent file recovery - Have important data that you want to make sure it's deleted beyond recovery? Simply fill the drive after deletion/formation with a large dummy file. Normal file deletion or disk formation procedures only modify the file allocation table (FAT) to make the space available for writing without actually removing the data, so it makes data recovery possible by scanning through the entire disk to look for remaining data traces. By filling up those available spaces with dummy file contact, it overwrites all the those data traces with dummy file content.
I certainly don't think that it would fool file sharing networks or computer forensic investigators, but some interesting suggestions.

http://www.mynikko.com/dummy/

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