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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2015 10:40 am 
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Robolinux is another Linux distro especialy built for virtualization that comes with some Windows tricks up the sleeve...



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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2015 3:31 pm 
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Midas wrote:
Robolinux turns your C Drive into a virtual Windows machine you can run in Linux

That's really cool.  I essentially do that with on a Mac (one of the older models that's not glued shut).  Still, I wonder why you need a separate distro for that.  Would be ideal for other distros to integrate that while the robolinux dude gets his donations for doing something so obvious and cool.

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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2015 4:54 am 
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Quick note about two excellent step-by-step Ubuntu installation guides (note also that Linux Mint is still pretty much an Ubuntu derivative, making these relevant for it, too):


Here's a graphic found in the latter: :twisted:

    Image

And for the truly fearless, there's also this: http://goodbye-microsoft.com/...


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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2015 10:08 pm 
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Mint is definitely a good choice to start with. A good source for reviews on various distros is "Distrowatch weekly" http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20150209".

I somewhat recently installed LXLE 12.04.04, a Lubuntu (Ubuntu with LXDE) on an older Dell Latitude D610 and it runs great and it's LTS as well. I went with an older version because the 13 and 14 series are a bit heavy for it.

There is always a learning curve but it's definitely worth it and those with older systems can breathe new life into them.


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 Post subject: Re: Camicri Cube
PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2015 12:16 pm 
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FYI, I recently came across Camicri Cube and, although portability has a whole different meaning in Linuxphere (plus, I haven't really tested it), it's still relevant for anyone concerned with portability...

    Camicri Cube is a portable package manager (Like Synaptic and Ubuntu Software Center, but a portable one) that can be used and run in any platform (Windows, Apt-Based Linux Distributions), online and offline, in flashdrive or any removable devices without installing anything. It enables you to download Linux Applications in any computer, and installs it back to your original computer. It is developed in hope that it become useful to offline Linux users community and to make Linux applications easier to download and install.

Furthermore, there's a good illustrated review of Camicri Cube at http://www.unixmen.com/camicri-cube-offline-portable-package-management-system/.

Incidentally, I really inclined to download and test recently launched Bhodhi v3.0.0 distro (http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=08816), since it has a proven development history and seems to tick all the right items for a relatively non-partisan linuxer. :roll:


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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 4:24 am 
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Just FYI, Linux Mint servers were attacked and the devs are fighting this for a few months now... More info on their official blog: http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3007

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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:49 pm 
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joby_toss wrote:
Mint servers were attacked and the devs are fighting this for a few months now... More info on their official blog: http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3007

Interesting stuff. Scary, too. I've been worried for a long time that malware developers would target open projects for their evil sh-t. I just assumed that - because they use open tools themselves - they would have some vague sense of the danger of such behavior. I guess not.

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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 12:54 pm 
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More than a year from planing to... harsh reality... Only now I was able to get a new machine. I just finished installing win 10 (took only 9 minutes, really incredible technology these days) and will set up a dual boot system soon using Mint. There were too many factors against a Linux only system for my daily tasks (including work related), giving that it will be my one and only system...

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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 11:51 am 
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I have a suggestion- a Linux-dedicated sub-forum for all Linux-related stuff (distributions, software, tips and tricks, etc). With the advent of Windows 10 spyware more and more users are considering migration to Linux (including me) and I think that a Linux sub-forum where we would discuss, ask questions and share Linux knowledge would be useful. There are many Linux-dedicated forums but I suppose you know that the Linux geeks almost never hide their contempt for novices and Windows users (like me) and in general it is not easy to get useful answers without scornful remarks.

Additionally, I think that an Android-dedicated sub-forum would also be useful.

What do you think?


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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 3:24 pm 
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@smaragdus:

I use Windows 8.1, NetBSD and Slackware Linux. I've used Linux on and off since about 2001, and BSD more or less the same. My advice to anyone considering Linux is to aim higher than the so-called newbie distributions like Ubuntu and its derivatives. Slackware and OpenSUSE are two distributions which are often classed as difficult but you will be much happier using them after putting in the initial effort, which really isn't that much anyway.

The new OpenSUSE Leap is quite nice for people new to Linux, and it makes installation of Wine quite easy. I'd be surprised if Wine didn't run most Windows portable apps. OpenSUSE also makes it easy to install virtual machines.

For me the best desktop interface is the classic Windows interface. The best apps are also apps which run on Windows. The trouble is, Microsoft are doing their best to alienate users with their brain-dead decision-making, although there are personalities in Linux who are alienating many Linux users as well. Regardless, I don't hold out much hope for Windows over the next decade. My approach, therefore, is to set up a Linux desktop as my main workstation, and use as many Linux apps as possible - Blender, Scribus, Lyx, and so on. I was fortunate to acquire a Windows 2012 server licence through an education program, and I will use that in a Virtual Machine for the Windows apps that really have no acceptable substitute in Linux. Portable Windows apps should run fine in Wine.

In OpenSUSE you can get the new KDE 5 to look identical to the classic Windows interface, and in many ways KDE 5 as a desktop environment is superior to Windows as a desktop environment (I am prescinding from the application stack on top, which is superior on Windows).

The bottom line for me is this: don't be put off by contrary Linux users. I am one of them occasionally but I do like to help Windows users make the move, so don't judge us on our off-days. The second recommendation is this: aim a bit higher than the newbie distros like Ubunut and Mint. OpenSUSE and Slackware are not hard to master, and you will know more about Linux by using them than you would by using a distro where everything is laid on a plate for you. Finally, OpenSUSE is based on SUSE Enterprise Server 12, and both projects have good, up-to-date, official documentation. This cannot be said for the hand-holding distributions I mentioned earlier.

Good luck one and all with your choice.


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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 4:09 pm 
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@gezley
First, thank you very much for your informative post.
I use Windows 8 right now (most of its nuisances smothered by Classic Shell- I can't Imagine using Windows without it).
Years ago I had Ubuntu (I think versions 8 & 9) but I had problems with the video driver.
I was considering Linux Mint with Cinnamon. I would like to ask- what is wrong with Linux Mint- is it terribly dumbed down compared to Slackware for example?
My first problem no matter what Linux distribution I will choose (I have been also advised to get Arch Linux and Debian)- I have no knowledge how to make a dual boot with evil UEFI and If I make a mistake I can easily damage my system. As far as I remember once Ubuntu offered an extremely easy option to install Ubuntu inside Windows (the user needed only to define the size of the new partition). There are several guides how to make a dual boot system yet I feel uncomfortable.


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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 4:33 pm 
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smaragdus wrote:
@gezley
First, thank you very much for your informative post.

You're welcome!
Quote:
I use Windows 8 right now (most of its nuisances smothered by Classic Shell- I can't Imagine using Windows without it).

Same here! An outstanding contribution to my sanity over the past few years!
:D
Quote:
Years ago I had Ubuntu (I think versions 8 & 9) but I had problems with the video driver.

Ugghhh - really, don't go with Ubuntu. Just when you learn how to use it they will decide to go off on a tangent and abandon you. They've done it before.
You people here at portablefreeware are all more knowledgeable than the average Windows user, so why do you go into your shells and cower when it comes to Linux? Be brave and adopt a Linux distribution for mature users, not a toy. Honestly - Slackware and OpenSUSE are not hard to learn; don't let anyone tell you otherwise. If you like having control over your own computer then please take my advice seriously; learn a Linux that will allow you to tinker; learn a Linux that exposes its innards so that in years to come you will have a good foundation, and if you then decide to opt for something more user-friendly then at least you will have the knowledge behind you to make an informed choice.
Quote:
I was considering Linux Mint with Cinnamon. I would like to ask- what is wrong with Linux Mint- is it terribly dumbed down compared to Slackware for example?

No, it's not terribly dumbed down. You just won't learn anything, and that will be frustrating.
If you have the resources why not install Slackware or OpenSUSE in a Virtualbox machine and play around for a few months, learning how it works? I use Slackware but I recommend OpenSUSE for someone completely new to Linux; it will still teach you more about Linux than Ubuntu and its derivatives would, but it is very easy to pick up. Seriously, take my advice and jump in at the deep end. If Linux is something you might be using in a few years' time would it not be better to first get a strong grasp of the essentials and what is under the hood?
Quote:
My first problem no matter what Linux distribution I will choose (I have been also advised to get Arch Linux and Debian)- I have no knowledge how to make a dual boot with evil UEFI and If I make a mistake I can easily damage my system. As far as I remember once Ubuntu offered an extremely easy option to install Ubuntu inside Windows (the user needed only to define the size of the new partition). There are several guides how to make a dual boot system yet I feel uncomfortable.

Yes - this is not easy. Do you have the resources to run a virtual machine? That way you could take your time and stay with Windows for another year or two while picking up the essentials of Linux. Arch is OK, though in my opinion Crux upon which Arch was based is far better, while Debian is ridiculously over-engineered. Debian developers don't like to leave upstream software in the pristine state in which its developer left it; they like to add their own sugar and cream on top which can be infuriating. In general Slackware and OpenSUSE give you what they inherit from developers upstream; for example, the CD burning software cdrecord is given to you as its developer intended it to be, while Debian aren't happy to do this but prefer rather to impose their own "We know better" sugar-coating on top. In my opinion this is arrogant, even if with Debian's manpower they can make it work.


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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 5:10 pm 
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@gezley
Hey, many thanks again. You gave me an excellent idea- to try several distributions in a virtual machine first. Which one you think is better- VirtualBox or VMware Player? I know that one day I will be forced to switch to Linux but for the time being I really prefer a dual boot system so I will read the UEFI manuals. I will play with Linux distros in a virtual machine but unfortunately I don't have so much time to spend on learning a new OS in its depths and I am aware that there is too much to learn and that the Linux knowledge base is overwhelming. I have also no experience with Wine and I don't know how many of the programs I use would run fine under Wine. I have been postponing the installation of Linux for quite some time but I hope that I will soon have enough time to run a Linux distro in a virtual machine.


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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 5:39 pm 
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smaragdus wrote:
@gezley
Hey, many thanks again. You gave me an excellent idea- to try several distributions in a virtual machine first. Which one you think is better- VirtualBox or VMware Player? I know that one day I will be forced to switch to Linux but for the time being I really prefer a dual boot system so I will read the UEFI manuals. I will play with Linux distros in a virtual machine but unfortunately I don't have so much time to spend on learning a new OS in its depths and I am aware that there is too much to learn and that the Linux knowledge base is overwhelming. I have also no experience with Wine and I don't know how many of the programs I use would run fine under Wine. I have been postponing the installation of Linux for quite some time but I hope that I will soon have enough time to run a Linux distro in a virtual machine.


Virtualbox is fine, although VMWare Player might be better for gaming - not sure about that since I have very modest gaming needs. If you decide to use Virtualbox then make sure to install the Guest Additions as well, since they will give you some nice features like full screen and folder sharing between host and guest. I don't visit this forum very often so if you have a problem nstalling these in your first Linux guest just PM me; I haven't looked but I'm sure that feature must be available at the forum here???

You can set up several virtual machines: one for Slackware, another for OpenSUSE, and another for Live CDs.

The Live CD VM will allow you to quickly test several Linux distros: for example, Mint, Manjaro, Netrunner, Kaos, Chakra, Mageia, Korora. That way you can quickly dismiss those you don't like.

Of the two major desktop environments (Gnome and KDE) I would be inclined to go with KDE 5, even though I resisted KDE for many years. The KDE team have good intentions, and they do not make life difficult for other teams, the way, for example, the Gnome team have made life difficult for the Xfce team. The other reason to go with KDE is that it is a very, very powerful desktop; when you strip away all the apps on your Windows computer the bare Windows desktop is not very powerful. KDE is the opposite; you have complete control over positioning of windows, virtual desktops, activities, and so on. In a couple of years' time, when the relatively new KDE 5 matures the way KDE 4 matured, there will be nothing to match it in either the Windows world or the Linux world. Nothing. And I say that as someone who really disliked KDE for many years.

As for learning Linux (and BSD), the best way to handle it is to look at the requirements for two certification paths - the general Linux certification LPIC path, at levels 1, 2 and 3, and the Red Hat-specific path RHCSA and RHCE. You can download the requirements for these certification paths and tackle them as you go along. You don't even have to do the exams; just use them as a guide to getting a good, broad knowledge of Linux.

There are two major enterprise versions of Linux - Red Hat and Suse. Red Hat has freely-available clones, the most important of which are CentOS and Scientific Linux. I am fond of Scientific. You can use it in a VM to study the RHCSA and RHCE cert paths, while you can use OpenSUSE (a near-enough clone of its enterprise big-brother Suse) for the LPIC.

You can easily stick with Windows for another 2 or 3 years while learning Linux bit by bit in a VM, using the certification paths I have mentioned to structure your learning. Take the exam requirements one step at a time, and aim to have at least LPIC 1 and 2 covered in 24-36 months. Again, my advice is to aim high. If you are leaving Windows for Linux then you should take advantage of all the power Linux has to offer. Starting off with a hand-holding distro like Mint will leave you very disappointed in Linux in years to come, and because you started off at the shallow end you will be reluctant to change half-way through to a more demanding (and more satisfying) distro. Think of it like the gears in a car - when you learn to drive you might not use all the gears, but when you are a competent driver you will definitely want all the gears available.


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 Post subject: Re: Linux distro for a novice
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 9:11 pm 
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smaragdus wrote:
My first problem no matter what Linux distribution I will choose (I have been also advised to get Arch Linux and Debian)- I have no knowledge how to make a dual boot with evil UEFI and If I make a mistake I can easily damage my system. As far as I remember once Ubuntu offered an extremely easy option to install Ubuntu inside Windows (the user needed only to define the size of the new partition). There are several guides how to make a dual boot system yet I feel uncomfortable.


I have UEFI dual boot myself. Although in my case Windows and GNU/Linux are on separate hard drives: Windows on an internal drive and GNU/Linux on an external one.

GNU/Linux distributions set up dual boot for you by default if they detect that Windows is already installed. Wiping Windows without warning would be a very bad user experience, and therefore no one does that.

(Myself I unplugged my internal hard drive when I installed GNU/Linux in order to prevent it from detecting Windows. If the operating systems are on separate drives, they don't need to know about each other: I can select the right drive in the UEFI boot menu.)

smaragdus wrote:
Which one you think is better- VirtualBox or VMware Player?


They're both good. I weakly suggest VirtualBox because it's open source.

smaragdus wrote:
I have also no experience with Wine and I don't know how many of the programs I use would run fine under Wine.


Wine doesn't work well in my experience. I don't bother with it at all anymore.

gezley wrote:
I don't visit this forum very often so if you have a problem nstalling these in your first Linux guest just PM me; I haven't looked but I'm sure that feature must be available at the forum here???


Yes, the PM section is in the User Control Panel.

gezley wrote:
Of the two major desktop environments (Gnome and KDE) I would be inclined to go with KDE 5, even though I resisted KDE for many years. The KDE team have good intentions, and they do not make life difficult for other teams, the way, for example, the Gnome team have made life difficult for the Xfce team. The other reason to go with KDE is that it is a very, very powerful desktop; when you strip away all the apps on your Windows computer the bare Windows desktop is not very powerful. KDE is the opposite; you have complete control over positioning of windows, virtual desktops, activities, and so on. In a couple of years' time, when the relatively new KDE 5 matures the way KDE 4 matured, there will be nothing to match it in either the Windows world or the Linux world. Nothing. And I say that as someone who really disliked KDE for many years.


I use KDE Plasma myself. I have always liked it, precisely because I want feature-rich software.

gezley wrote:
As for learning Linux (and BSD), the best way to handle it is to look at the requirements for two certification paths - the general Linux certification LPIC path, at levels 1, 2 and 3, and the Red Hat-specific path RHCSA and RHCE. You can download the requirements for these certification paths and tackle them as you go along. You don't even have to do the exams; just use them as a guide to getting a good, broad knowledge of Linux.


I learned GNU/Linux by simply using it and looking up information when necessary (GNU/Linux has been my secondary operating system for almost seven years *). I realize it may not work for everyone. It worked for me because I'm eager to learn and want to do things in the right way (e.g. install programs from repositories instead of hunting websites for download links).

* The above section about how I installed GNU/Linux is about the latest install to be exact. I modernized everything at once: I switched the distribution from Kubuntu to siduction, the bitness from 32-bit to 64-bit, and even the partition table format from MBR to GPT (the last one is necessary for UEFI booting). The original install seven years ago was to an external drive too, mind you.

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