SniffPass v1.13

Checker on 22 Mar 2014

SniffPass is a small password monitoring software that listens to your network, capturing the passwords that pass through your network adapter and display them instantly. SniffPass captures passwords using the 'Raw Socket' method. It is able to determine the following Protocols: POP3, IMAP4, SMTP, FTP, and HTTP (basic authentication passwords).

Category:
System Requirements: Win98 / WinME / WinNT / Win2K / WinXP / Vista
Writes settings to: Application folder
Dependencies: It uses the 'Raw Sockets' method, but can have some limitations on certain systems. If it's unable to capture passwords try either WinPcap capture driver or the Microsoft Network Monitor, which should solve the problem.
Stealth: ? Yes
License: Freeware
How to extract: Download the ZIP package and extract to a folder of your choice. Launch SniffPass.exe.
What's new?
  • Fixed bug: When opening the 'Capture Options' dialog-box after Network Monitor Driver 3.x was previously selected, SniffPass switched back to Raw Sockets mode.

2 comments on SniffPass  The Portable Freeware Collection Latest Entries Feed

CrimsonStrange 2010-07-15 11:13

Symantec AntiVirus says this program is a threat - labels it HackTool.SniffPass Info from the Symantec site: Updated: January 15, 2010 4:46:01 PM
Type: Security Assessment Tool
Risk Impact: Low
Systems Affected: Linux, Solaris, Windows 2000, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows NT, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, Windows XP

BehaviorPasswordRevealer is a Security Assessment Tool intended to discover passwords by sniffing network traffic.
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I can see where it could be used as a malicious program, but I'm betting this is a false positive. You'll have to make your antivirus program ignore it to use it, I suppose. Just wanted everybody who downloads this know about it...

Tintenkiller 2010-09-08 09:15

Sadly, that's pretty common nowadays.

A lot of Nirsofts great tools are labeled als hacking software by numerous AntiVirus Apps (e.g. Trend Micro). Thus trying to block them. It's always a pain in the ass.

But not much you can do about it.

It's not really a false positive either - since those tools ARE sort of hacking tools. But the tools themselves do nothing harmful per se.

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